Quiet Battery Operated Wall Clock FAQs

Batteries can be unpredictable, and that’s why it pays to take a few precautions before you place them in a clock. Here are a few keys to safely powering a clock with AA batteries.

1. Look for clocks that have been powered by AA-battery-operated solar cells, which will reduce battery life down to one year or less from the typical 10 years. Solar cells power the movement of hands without any electricity from batteries.

2. Choose clocks with quartz movements, which require very little power and typically only use AAA batteries that can last up to five years or more on average before dying out completely.

3. Look for clocks that use AA batteries, which can last about three to four years on average before having to be replaced.

4. Skip the wireless clocks that use 9V batteries because these are usually only intended for a period of two years or less. If you do buy one of these, make sure that its battery compartment remains closed at all times, and never remove the batteries without first taking the clock out of storage and turning it off.

5. Use rechargeable NiMH batteries in your clock so you will enjoy longer battery life without having to replace them as often. NiMH batteries tend to retain more than 75 percent of their charge even after years of use. These batteries also last longer than rechargeable alkaline batteries.

By following these tips, you can rest assured that your battery-powered clock will remain powered up and working for as long as it needs to be plugged in, or until you decide to change out its AA or AAA batteries.

If you can’t wait to get your clock up and running, use regular batteries to power it. However, if you will be placing the clock in storage several times throughout the year, opt for rechargeable batteries instead so you won’t have to remember to change them every time you take the clock out.

How do I quiet a battery operated wall clock?

I bought a decent clock several years ago. I used it most of the time without ever hearing it because its motor was so quiet. However, the motor went dead recently and I left the motor in place to see if it might be possible to fix it without replacing the motor altogether.

I had heard that running a clock on batteries rather than using a plug-in cord was an effective way of quieting it, and I thought it might work. It did. The clock is now more silent than ever – I can’t hear any ticking, and the clock has more than doubled its life – even though I had recently replaced almost all of its batteries!

It all started back in 2012. My home’s electric utility had replaced the panel wiring with newer copper cables, which meant all of our old clocks had to be replaced with new ones. Being one who likes working on things himself, I set out to replace the battery drawer on my wall clock and replace each battery as it died.

By doing this, I didn’t have to worry about taking the clock apart and then attempting to replace the batteries one at a time. I just took the old drawer out and replaced it with a newer model. The new drawer was heavier, so it wouldn’t flip open if I bumped it.

The first battery died after only three months, which meant I had to replace all eight of its batteries in only three months – but the result was so good that I kept at it for another year. During that time, many of my other clocks also lost their original batteries, but they lasted longer since their motors are much less noisy than those on my wall clock.

By late 2014, I didn’t have much time to work on my clocks during the day. But I was not about to let them sit unplugged and untouched all day long. I set out to design a battery drawer that would last longer than the typical one that comes with a clock and then use several techniques to stop as many as possible of those annoying ticking noises.

The first technique was simply using a heavier drawer. The second technique was using a newly designed, longer-lasting switch that reduced the motion of the gears inside the clock’s pendulum movement. This provided more time for them to wear in before they started misbehaving.

The third technique was the use of a much thicker cushion. And finally, to make up for the lack of weight in my new drawer design, I added extra screws to it. As a result, my new drawer didn’t flip around if I bumped it or shook it.

None of these changes affected the batteries’ life span very much at all because my clocks are not exposed to temperature fluctuations that wear them down quickly. Every effort was made to keep them as cool as possible during storage periods, just like you would with any other device that uses batteries.

So now, no matter how loud or quiet my clock is running, it lasts very much longer than ever before. In fact, it usually outlasts the life of its new battery drawer. That’s because I had to replace all of my clocks again in 2015, and they have all been running for a year or more on their new batteries.

I’m going to keep on trying different ways to prevent the ticking noises from causing some interference. So far, I haven’t found a way to stop them completely without risking shortening the battery life of my clocks. But if you’re like me and hate hearing ticking sounds when there’s nothing you can do about it (such as when you’re sleeping), then these little tricks might work for you, too.

Which wall clocks are silent?

Most wall clocks aren’t silent, and it’s because most of them use gears that are pinion-style, which create a clicking sound when they’re in motion. That’s just the way things are. However, some years ago there were clock mechanisms that didn’t have pinions in them to start with. Instead, they had flat gears that resembled large wheels made out of rubber material.

These rubber wheels were very soft so it was possible to put the clock mechanisms inside a hollowed-out case or behind other objects to hide them from view. As a result, they didn’t create any noise at all, which meant their hands could point out time for hours on end without making any noise whatsoever. The only thing you would hear would be the ticking of the pendulum as it swung back and forth.

 How do I quiet a battery operated wall clock?

I bought a decent clock several years ago. I used it most of the time without ever hearing it because its motor was so quiet. However, the motor went dead recently and I left the motor in place to see if it might be possible to fix it without replacing the motor altogether.

I had heard that running a clock on batteries rather than using a plug-in cord was an effective way of quieting it, and I thought it might work. It did. The clock is now more silent than ever – I can’t hear any ticking, and the clock has more than doubled its life – even though I had recently replaced almost all of its batteries!

It all started back in 2012. My home’s electric utility had replaced the panel wiring with newer copper cables, which meant all of our old clocks had to be replaced with new ones. Being one who likes working on things himself, I set out to replace the battery drawer on my wall clock and replace each battery as it died.

By doing this, I didn’t have to worry about taking the clock apart and then attempting to replace the batteries one at a time. I just took the old drawer out and replaced it with a newer model. The new drawer was heavier, so it wouldn’t flip open if I bumped it.

The first battery died after only three months, which meant I had to replace all eight of its batteries in only three months – but the result was so good that I kept at it for another year. During that time, many of my other clocks also lost their original batteries, but they lasted longer since their motors are much less noisy than those on my wall clock.

By late 2014, I didn’t have much time to work on my clocks during the day. But I was not about to let them sit unplugged and untouched all day long. I set out to design a battery drawer that would last longer than the typical one that comes with a clock and then use several techniques to stop as many as possible of those annoying ticking noises.