The Portable Sound Barrier industry is a fast-growing industry that creates sound-absorbing barriers to protect people. This blog post lists 15 terms everyone in the industry should know.

Aerial noise attenuation: The process of reducing noise propagation in the air by way of noise attenuation associated with structures or physical features, such as trees, buildings, hills, and other natural phenomena.
Baffle wall: A wall that separates two performance venues (a stage and an audience), often at right angles (90 degrees) oriented toward each other to form an enclosed space between them; sometimes used for funneling sound to the stage or musical instruments specifically designed for this purpose.
Baffle wall construction: The layering of materials or substances on a plane surface to attenuate sound waves.
Benchmark test results: Results of tests performed on test samples made by industry contractors to compare sample performance to specifications.
Bruise attenuation: The reduction of pavement noise caused by impacting the surface with the wheels of a vehicle or heavy equipment. Bruise is an impulsive noise that is often not heard at low energy levels, but is heard at high energy levels because it is relatively long in duration. Bruise is also considered one of the more “noisy” noises, as some vehicles/heavy equipment produce it through their engine exhaust system prior to their muffler being located on their undercarriage.
C-weighted sound pressure level (SPL): The C-weighted sound pressure level is a plane-based measure of pressure attenuation associated with a plane surface.
Centerline speaker: A loudspeaker located on the centerline of an exhibit at a trade show, fair, or similar event.
Center wall: The wall between two performance venues (a stage and an audience), usually at right angles (90 degrees) oriented toward each other to form an enclosed space between them; sometimes used for funneling sound to the stage or musical instruments specifically designed for this purpose.
Center wall construction: The layering of materials or substances on a plane surface to attenuate sound waves.
D-Weighted sound pressure level (SPL): The D-weighted sound pressure level is a plane-based measure of pressure attenuation associated with a plane surface.
Edge material: Materials used to contain and redirect airborne particle activity in the setting of turf, trees, and other vegetative growth, which is common in areas where there is soil erosion. These materials may be applied directly to the ground or planted in such a manner such that they can interact with the soil and vegetation for attenuation purposes.
Edge padding: A cushion of material placed around the edges of seating areas to protect them from vehicle impact or impact damage.
Engineered sound system: A noise control system that delivers sound with a minimum of distortion and attenuation of level, frequency, and phase.
Exclusive, single-user contract: A contract that only one person or company is authorized to use on a specific area or venue for a specific period of time. It is typically exclusive within the region governed by the organization issuing the contract.
Exterior noise barrier walls: Walls built to complete an enclosure on all sides, which are typically constructed between two performance venues (a stage and an audience).
Frequency: The number of times a sound wave passes a fixed point in one second.
Ground truth: The physical measurement of a test sample, which is sometimes called an “acoustic measurement,” using a calibrated test instrument, such as a calibrated microphone.
Hell’s Bells: A specialized exhaust system that uses high-pitched sound waves to reduce the pitch of exhaust noise while allowing the vehicle to get optimal performance from its engine and other systems.
High-fidelity sound system: A noise control system that delivers sound with minimal distortion and attenuation of level, frequency, and phase.
Impulsive noise: The sound that can be heard suddenly, without warning.
In-car speaker: A loudspeaker installed in a vehicle cabin to deliver audio to the driver and passengers.
Intelligent sound system: A noise control system that uses a combination of algorithms to control the delivery of sound while controlling acoustic feedback from the space being filled.
Individual contract: A contract that is identical to others issued for a specific event or venue on a specific date and only one person or company is authorized to use on a specific area or venue for a specific period of time. It is typically for “single-user” use only, meaning it may not be used by more than one person at any given time.

What can I use as a sound barrier?

Laboratory large-scale noise barrier: A one-time, large-scale noise barrier constructed for a noise control test in a laboratory environment. Typically used to test the effect of mass and acoustical treatments on attenuation.
Interior noise barrier walls: Walls built to complete an enclosure on one or two sides, which are typically constructed between two performance venues (a stage and an audience).
Isolation: The prevention of sound distribution from one compartment to another through the use of materials or devices that block, absorb, or otherwise attenuate sound from leaving its originating compartment.
Mechanical vibration: The transfer of energy from one object to another by way of direct contact with no medium involved in the transfer.
Mechanically augmented sound system: A noise control system where speakers are supplemented with subwoofers, horns, or other devices that use the ground or walls for support.
Multiple-user contract: A contract that may be used by more than one person or company on a specific area or venue for a specific period of time.
Multi-use contract: A contract that may be used by more than one person or company on a specific area or venue for a specific period of time.
Multiple-user exclusive contract: An exclusive multi-use contract term allowing the user to remain as the sole occupant for himself/herself and one additional person during the terms of the agreement. This would allow the user to have a maximum of two people to occupy the location, but would provide exclusive rights.
Multiple-user non-exclusive contract: An exclusive multi-use contract term allowing the user to remain as the sole occupant for himself/herself and one additional person during the terms of the agreement. This would allow the user to have a maximum of two people to occupy the location, but would not provide exclusive rights.
Non-replicated sample: A sample that is unique because it does not have a duplicate for comparison, i.e., “ground truth”.
Offsite construction: Noise control improvements or treatments that are built offsite from an area or venue where sound is being produced.

temporary outdoor sound barrier?

Pitched noise: The sound that can be heard when the pitch of the sound wave is higher than that of the original sound.
Placed-in sound: The effect caused by sound sources placed inside a space, such as between two adjacent performance venues (a stage and an audience).
Plane-based attenuation: The attenuation or absorption of airborne particles flying in or through a plane space, such as blades of grass, leaves, and other vegetative growth.
Peak SPL: A measure of maximum level reached by a signal received by a noise measuring device over a specific time period.
Pitch: A measurement and description of frequency.
Pitched-noise: A noise that has a low frequency or low pitch.
Positive sound system: A noise control system that delivers sound with minimal distortion and attenuation of level, frequency, and phase.
Post Construction: Noise control improvements or treatments that are built after an area or venue has been constructed.
Power divider: Sound control device capable of subtracting two signals from each other to create a cancellation effect, such as when a sound source produces a desirable audio signal and a contaminating audio signal at the same time. The undesirable signal is reduced by the provider of the desirable audio signal. This can be accomplished using noise cancelling headphones.

Best portable sound barrier curtain?

Low frequency: The sound wave that has a low frequency and low pitch.
Sound: A fluctuation in pressure, particle displacement, particle velocity, or other physical property in a medium with internal forces that causes energy to be transmitted through the medium.
Sound control: The study and use of sound-energy absorption and reflection to reduce the production of unwanted noise and attenuation of unwanted sound energy.
Sound energy: The movement or operation of air particles as they travel through the air to reach the ears of a listener. Sound energy may be absorbed or reflected by materials that lie between the source and listener before reaching their ears. Sound energy may also be taken into or emitted from materials that lie between the source and listener.
Sound level: A measure of the noise produced by a sound source.
Sound pressure: The acoustic energy of an alternating electric current in air driven at the sound transmission speed by sources driven with an alternating current driving voltage.
Sound transmission speed (STS): The speed at which sound travels in air through free space when its pressure is held constant.
Spaceborne attenuation: Sound attenuation caused by particles traveling through, in, or across a space between two spaces where sound may be transmitted.

portable outdoor sound barriers?

Sound absorption: The attenuation of sound energy caused by the isolation of sound waves in materials with a high internal density.
Sound barrier: A noise control material, such as a sheet of expanded polystyrene (EPS), foam, plywood, or other similar material, which is designed to prevent noise from passing through it.
Sound pressure level meters: Sound measuring devices used to determine the intensity and location of sound sources.
Sound transmission class: According to ISO standard 17025 in 2002 in Sweden, a method to evaluate and compare noise and vibration in construction in different sectors and in relation to its consequences for man and his environment.
Sound transmission class (STC): A way to measure and compare noise and vibration in construction in different sectors and in relation to its consequences for man and his environment.
Sound transmission loss: The attenuation of sound energy caused by the isolation of sound waves in materials with a high internal density.
Specification with requirements for absorption coefficients of porous building materials : ISO 140-5 defines an acoustical performance specification framework to be applied either directly or via incorporation within a full specification system.

Is sound barrier speed?

Sound masking: The use of background sounds to cover unwanted noise.
Sound quality: The combination of parameters that comprise the acoustic attributes of sound.
Spreading loss: Sound energy loss caused by the separation of the moving air particles as they spread out over a surface or through a space.
Standing wave: An audible condition created when sound waves resonate through space and reflect with sufficient strength to create interference patterns with other sound waves, thus retaining a state of equilibrium.
Storage material: A material used primarily for its ability to absorb moisture from surrounding materials and then release it back into those materials as needed for latent or thermal conditioning functions.

conclusion

The goal of “Noise Control” is to provide a sound control practice that satisfies the requirements of the people, their facility, and the regulatory bodies. This can be done by understanding power classification levels.

Noise Control classifications are used for different types of projects, including airport noise abatement projects, where there are regulatory guidelines based on airport traffic volumes.