Movable acoustic panels are the latest technology to create an acoustically-adjustable environment. These panels can be programmed to either increase or decrease the acoustic space, depending on the square footage of space they’re installed in. This allows for creating smaller natural spaces, improving conference room acoustics, or even reinforcing sound absorption in a given area.

Movable acoustic panels can also be used in a commercial application, such as creating acoustics for theaters and concert halls. They can be programmed to create the exact acoustic experience desired, and can even be programmed to create different acoustical experiences depending on the size of the space.

This paper will discuss how these panels are created, how they work, and what kind of spaces they can create. It will also discuss their advantages over conventional acoustic treatments, as well as their disadvantages. We will also briefly discuss how they are being used economically in commercial applications.

Do movable acoustic panels work?

Yes, and no. There are several ways in which these panels can be programmed to create the desired acoustic experience, but they’re not as versatile as one would hope. They can’t be programmed to create multiple acoustical experiences, for example. Movable acoustic panels only respond to sound waves hitting them from a certain direction, and cannot interact with sound that’s behind them or to the sides of them. This means that the acoustics of an entire space cannot change depending on where sound is coming from. While they can eliminate or decrease noise pollution in a given space, they will not be able to supplement it if more sound generation is required.

Movable acoustic panels can be programmed to create different acoustical experiences depending on the size of the space. So while the size of the space is unalterable, it can still be manipulated in accordance with what is needed.

Movable acoustic panels are essentially a specialized type of absorption, and an effective one at that. This means that they do absorb sound and reduce noise pollution in a given space, but only within a certain range. All absorbers have some level of reflection, which limits its effectiveness in eliminating noise pollution in certain areas. These panels only eliminate noise pollution while they’re moving around instead of when they’re static. This further limitations their overall ability to reduce noise pollution in spaces such as offices and recording studios.

This means that they can be effective in creating an acoustical experience tailored to the needs of the individual, but cannot create multiple experiences at the same time. This prevents them from working outside their intended scope of use.

These panels can also be effective at creating an acoustical experience for commercial applications, such as theaters and concert halls. Since their panels are flexible and can easily be reprogrammed to create whatever type of acoustic experience is desired, they’re perfect for this kind of commercial application. The end goal is always to provide superior acoustic quality for anyone who comes into contact with these spaces, so having a movable acoustic panel system that can create whatever sound quality is desired is ideal.

These panels can be expensive for this application, however. While they are easier to use than conventional acoustic treatments, they come with a higher price tag. Since these panels are customized for each individual space, the end user will need to first provide the company with an estimate of how many square feet of space they’re trying to create acoustics for. The company will then give the end user an estimate of what the panels will cost based on how many square feet of space the panels need to cover. This can be extremely beneficial if it’s done correctly, but can also be extremely costly if not properly managed.

An average commercial application of movable acoustic panels is recording studios and conference rooms.

Do acoustic panels block sound?
No, they do not. Panel systems are specifically designed to absorb sound waves, which means that it would be impossible for them to block sound if they did. This is why it’s recommended that these panels be spaced far enough apart to provide maximum effect.

Do acoustic panels “sound” the same?

No, they do not. One of the main reasons why audio engineers want these panels installed in their studios and recording spaces is to create different acoustical effects depending on how much sound they’re absorbing at any given time. These panels can actually be programmed to create multiple acoustical effects, depending on the number of panels that are installed.

These panels can be programmed to create different acoustical effects depending on the size of the space. Smaller panels will typically absorb more sound than larger ones, making them more effective at creating an acoustical experience tailored to the needs of any given space.

Are movable acoustic panels efficient?
Not really. These panels only eliminate noise pollution while they’re moving around instead of when they’re static because they block or absorb sound waves instead of absorbing it all at once, which means that there is wasted energy and material. This causes these panel systems to be very inefficient and expensive for their intended purpose.

Are movable acoustic panels effective?
Y
es, and no. There are several ways in which these panels can be programmed to create the desired acoustical experience, but they’re not as versatile as one would hope. They can’t be programmed to create multiple acoustical experiences, for example. Movable acoustic panels only respond to sound waves hitting them from a certain direction, and cannot interact with sound that’s behind them or to the sides of them. This means that their acoustics can’t change depending on where sound is coming from. While they can eliminate or decrease noise pollution in a given space, they will not be able to supplement it if more sound generation is required.
These panels can also be expensive for this application, however. While they are easier to use than conventional acoustic treatments, they come with a higher price tag. Since these panels are customized for each individual space, the end user will need to first provide the company with an estimate of how many square feet of space they’re trying to create acoustics for. The company will then give the end user an estimate of what the panels will cost based on how many square feet of space the panels need to cover.
This can be extremely beneficial if it’s done correctly, but can also be extremely costly if not properly managed.

Can you put one on a ceiling?
Yes and no. If this type of panel is properly mounted, it can be attached to the ceiling if the ceiling is strong enough. Although this will make it harder to take down and relocate, it will allow the panel system to achieve its full potential once again. This will also make it easier for users who are trying to achieve maximum sound absorption in a given space. If the panel is not properly attached to the ceiling, however, it will be significantly less effective than when mounted properly.


What material is best for absorbing sound?

This depends on the number of people in the space and what type of acoustical effects they’re trying to achieve. The best material for this application depends on a lot of different factors, especially the size and spacing of the panels. The type of material used should also be considered if other sound treatment methods are being used elsewhere in the space, such as ceiling tiles or absorbent materials. Ultimately, it’s best practice to consult with an certified acoustician if you’re unsure about what acoustic treatment method would work best for your setup or need more information about particular options available.


Can you use these panels indoors?
Yes, and no. These panels have been designed to work indoors or outdoors, but outdoor applications require extra precautions to be taken. This type of panel system is not ideal for outdoor use because of its lack of reliability and portability. They cannot be scheduled on a regular basis because it can become too expensive to operate them after a certain point, which means that the acoustics in a given space may not be consistent. This can also cause problems when recording audio, especially if the person recording the audio has no control over where the panels are placed.

Can you DIY acoustic panels?
This depends on the size of the panels, how many are being used, and their construction. If you’ve already got a sound treatment system installed in your space, you can take advantage of the unused space to create your own DIY-sized system. The size of the panels can be determined by taking measurements of your current system and either designing around these measurements or creating new panels to match them.

If this is not an option (and sometimes even if it is), there are some other options for getting DIY-sized acoustic panels that could work for you; however, these won’t allow you to adjust the panel effectiveness over time like professionally adjusted systems will.

Acoustic panels can be constructed to the desired specifications and then attached to a wall, ceiling, or floor if possible. This method allows you to create as many acoustic panels as you want and to adjust them as needed.

This may not be the most reliable solution if you plan on moving them around frequently because they will need to be attached securely to whatever surface they’re sitting on. It’s best practice, however, for users who are looking for an easy way of instantly controlling their acoustics. The difficulty of this project is determined by how hard it is to mount them correctly whenever necessary.

What is acoustic standing panels?
These are panels that are installed to the floor of a space, or sometimes attached to the side of an object. There are multiple ways that these panels can be attached, but most commonly they will attach to the side of the object instead. Standing acoustic panels will not be limited by where they’re supposed to go because they can be programmed with multiple acoustical effects.
These panels also have the ability to adjust their acoustics depending on where sound is coming from, which helps them become even more versatile than movable acoustic panels.


There are a number of possible applications for acoustic panels, but they are not the only way to treat sound in a space. They have their strengths in certain spaces, however, and can be useful in many different ways depending on what your needs are in your space. That being said, whether you’re looking to replace an existing acoustic treatment system or you’re trying to design one from scratch, there are plenty of tools available for you to make the process easier.
If you have any other comments about acoustic panels or sound treatments in general, feel free to ask us below!